South Koreans bow in tribute to Vietnamese massacre victims

Nguyen Thi Thanh (C) and two South Korean officials sit at a ceremony in the central province of Quang Nam on Sunday to commemorate the South Korean massacre that killed 135 people in February 1968. Thanh is a survivor of the mass murder in the provinces Ha My Village, which occurred during the peak of the Vietnam War, and days after a South Korean jeep was blown up by a landmine in the village.

Nguyen Thi Thanh (C) and two South Korean mourners sit at a ceremony in the central province of Quang Nam on Sunday to commemorate a South Korean massacre that killed 135 people in February 1968. Thanh is a survivor of the mass murder in the province"s Ha My Village which occurred during the peak of the Vietnam War, and days after a South Korean jeep was blown up by a landmine in the village.

Villagers perform death anniversary ceremonies for the 135 victims.

Villagers perform death anniversary ceremonies for the 135 victims.

A mass grave of the victims

A mass grave for the victims

A stone stele names the victims, many of them infants and unborn children who are listed as nameless.

A stone stele bears the names the victims, many of them infants and unborn children who are listed as “nameless.”

80-year-old Tran Thi Thu bursts into tears as she listens to stories about the South Korean armys raid. She lost a son and a daughter in the attack.

80-year-old Tran Thi Thu bursts into tears as she listens to stories about the South Korean army’s raid. She lost a son and a daughter in the attack.

Thu lost her right foot due to exploded grenade. It hurts me a lot to recall all of this. But the past is in the past, the South Koreans have come here and apologized many times, so I no longer feel resentment, Thu said.

Thu lost her right foot due to a grenade. “It hurts a lot to recall all of this. But the past is in the past, and the South Koreans have come here and apologized many times, so I no longer feel resentment,” Thu said.

Ku Su Jeong, a reporter and vice president of the Korean-Vietnamese Peace Foundation, stands among the crowd of South Koreans waiting to pay tribute. Ku has covered several stories to expose the war crime and founded the Sorry Vietnam movement.

Ku Su Jeong, a reporter and vice president of the Korean-Vietnamese Peace Foundation, stands among the crowd of South Koreans waiting to pay tribute. Ku has covered several stories to expose the war crime, and founded the “Sorry Vietnam” movement asking the South Korean government to admit the atrocity and apologize to Vietnam.

Kang U Il, President of the Korean-Vietnamese Peace Foundation, lights incense to pay tribute for the victims.

Kang U Il, President of the Korean-Vietnamese Peace Foundation, lights incense to pay tribute to the victims.

South Korean legislator Kim Hyun Kwon bows to the stele carrying the victims names.

South Korean legislator Kim Hyun Kwon bows to the stele carrying the victims" names.

A group of South Korean people kneel and bow to apologize to Quang Nam people for the massacre.

A group of South Korean people kneel and bow to apologize to the people of Quang Nam for the massacre.

Vietnamese survivor tells tragic tale of South Korean massacre
 
 
South Koreans bow in tribute to Vietnamese massacre victims
Vietnamese survivor tells tragic tale of South Korean massacre
Nguồn: e.vnexpress.net